Our 2018-2019 Curriculum

Here is our family’s Elementary to High School
Curriculum Choices for the 2018-2019 school year! 

 

ELEMENTARY

Our 3rd Grader:

 

  • Reading/Phonics: All About Reading: Level 4; Explode the Code books 6-7
  • Literature: The Boxcar Children, Encyclopedia Brown, Mouse & the Motorcycle, The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, How To Eat Fried Worms, Mr. Popper’s Penguins, A Bear Called Paddington, Louis Braille
  • Handwriting: Hero Handwriting (for manuscript review); Conquering Cursive
  • Spelling: Joyful Heart Spelling Skills
  • Writing/Grammar/Composition: BJU English 3
  • Math: Horizons 3 (and moving into 4), Xtra Math
  • Bible: Awana T&T, daily Bible Reading
  • Additions: Choir, Trail Life (Woodland Hawk)

 

Our 5th Grader:

  • Reading/Literature: Lion, Witch, & Wardrobe, The Hundred Dresses, Heidi, Misty of Chincoteague, The Indian in the Cupboard, Twenty One Balloons, The Mysterious Benedict Society, Wonder, Esperanza Rising, Ginger Pye, The Penderwicks; participating in a once a month book club; free reading
  • Writing/Grammar/Composition: BJU English 5; Spelling through Scripture; Word Roots 1
  • Math: Horizons 5
  • Bible: Awana T&T, daily Bible Reading
  • Additions: violin lessons, piano lessons, choir, gymnastics

 

The Elementary ‘Together’ Subjects:

  • Science: Apologia Exploring Creation with Astronomy
  • Social Studies: Ancient History – Mystery of History 1 with corresponding read alouds, timeline, etc.
  • Art: See the Light Art Class

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Our 7th Grader:

    • Reading/Literature: Veritas Press Omnibus 2 Secondary (including The Hobbit , The Fellowship of the Ring , The Nine Tailors, The Dragon and the Raven, Merry Adventures of Robin Hood, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Winning His Spurs, The Two Towers, Henry V, King Richard III, and The Return of the King)
    • Writing/Grammar/Composition: BJU English 7 (online, self-paced course)
    • Vocabulary: Word Roots 3
    • Math: Saxon Math 8/7 with PreAlgebra
    • Science: Sonlight H – Technology
    • Social Studies: Sonlight Core H – World History (using the core history and only selective read alouds/readers)
    • Bible: Student Leader in Awana/Trek, daily Bible Reading
    • Spanish: Getting Started in Spanish
    • Computers: CompuScholar Digital Savvy (online, self-paced course)
    • Additions: Trail Life (Navigator)

 

 

HIGH SCHOOL

Our 9th Grader:

  • English 9 (Literary Analysis, Christian Literature, Grammar, and Composition):
    – Windows to the World: An Introduction to Literary Analysis by Lesha Myers
    – Full Length Novels
                    The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom
                    The Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan
                   The Practice of the Presence of God by Brother Lawrence
                   God’s Smuggler by Brother Andrew
                   Joni by Joni Eareckson Tada
                   Through the Gates of Splendor by Elisabeth Elliot
  • Algebra 1 with Integrated Geometry:  Shormann Algebra 1
  • Biology:  Apologia Exploring Creation with Biology
  • World Geography:  North Star Geography by Bright Ideas Press
  • Spanish 2: BJU self paced online course
  • Instrumental Music 1:  Cello lessons, Piano Lessons, Member of the local youth orchestra
  •  World Religion and Cultures:
                    But Don’t All Religions Lead to God?
                    World Religions: An Indispensable Introduction
                    Mimosa
                    Listening to the Language of the Bible
                    Sitting at the Feet of Rabbi Jesus

                    Sundar Singh: Footprints Over the Mountains
                    Queen of the Dark Chamber
                    Jacob Deshazer: Forgive Your Enemies
                    I Dared to Call Him Father
                    God’s Global Mosaic
                    Foreign to Familiar
                    iWitness Heresies and Cults
  • Additions: Student Leader in AWANA/Journey

 

Our 11th Grader:

  • English 11 (American Literature and Composition):
    – Sonlight American Literature 430
                    Eternity in Their Hearts           Brave Companions
                    Up From Slavery                       Elements of Style
                    A Separate Peace                       Best Short Stories of O. Henry 
                   Ender’s Game                              The Chosen
                    Outliers                                        The Grapes of Wrath 
                    Evidence Not Seen                    Jacob Have I Loved 
                    Teaching a Stone to Talk        The Portable Poe
                    Death of a Salesman                My Antonia 
                    100 Best Loved Poems             Fidelity
                    How to Read a Book                Our Town 
                    The Scarlett Letter                    On Writing Well
                    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
                    Their Eyes Were Watching God 
  • Algebra 2b with Integrated Geometry:  Shormann Algebra 2
  • Advanced Biology:  Apologia Exploring Creation with Advanced Biology
  • American History:  Exploring America by Notgrass
  • Spanish 2: BJU self paced online course
  • Creative Writing:  One Year Adventure Novel
  •  Information Technology:  CompuScholar Digital Savvy (online, self-paced course)
  • Additions: Student Leader in AWANA/Journey; Violin Lessons, Gymnastics, American Heritage Girls (Patriot); Driving Practice, PSAT/SAT Practice; writing/revising/editing her own novel

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Would you like to get a glimpse of what other homeschool moms have chosen for their families? 

Check out Curriculum Week posts during the 10th Annual Back to Homeschool Blog Hop!

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Would you like to see our curriculum choices from previous years?

2017-2018 (10th, 8th, 6th, 4th, 2nd)
2016-2017 (9th, 7th, 5th, 3rd, 1st)
2015-2016 (8th, 6th, 4th, 2nd, Kindergarten)
2014-2015 (7th, 5th, 3rd, 1st, PreK)
2013-2014 (6th, 4th, 2nd, K, preschool)
2012-2013 (5th, 3rd, 1st, PreK, 2 year old)
2011-2012 (4th, 2nd, K, 3’s preschool, toddler)
2010-2011 (3rd, 1st, PreK, 2 year old, 4 month old baby)
2009-2010 (2nd, K, 3’s preschool, toddler, baby arrived end of year)
2008-2009 (1st, PreK, 2 year old, 6 month old baby)
2007-2008 (K, 3’s preschool, toddler, baby arrived mid year)
2006-2007 (PreK, 2 year old, 7 month old baby)
                  – Joyful Heart Character
2005-2006 (3’s preschool, toddler, baby arrived mid year)
                  – Joyful Heart Bible and Rhyme
2004-2005 (2 year old, 6 mo old baby) 
                  – Joyful Heart Learning

Books, Books, Books!

Books, Books, Books!

 

Well, it’s finally happened.  We have five voracious readers in the house!  Books line our shelves, the library basket is overflowing, and the children are requesting to go check out more.  I asked my children which books have been their favorites over the years.  Here is a list of some of their
best loved chapter books .

From second grade through middle school, they’ve complied a tremendous list of book choices for you.  And, it’s just in time for summer reading!

IMG_3338Let’s Dig In!

 

 

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2nd Grade Favorites
   

Our fifth child took off with reading during his second grade year.  Yay! He went from loving the Frog and Toad series by Arnold Lobel to Marjorie Weinman Sharmat’s Nate the Great series.  He then surprised me and began reading the Imagination Station series!  He has almost completed all of the books in the Imagination Station series.  He enjoyed them so immensely that he requested that they be incorporated into his 8th birthday theme!    I’m hopeful we can find another series that he enjoys just as well.  He has (somewhat reluctantly) moved onto Geronimo Stilton books, but I’m planning on introducing him to the A to Z Mysteries, Encyclopedia Brown, and the Boxcar Children soon!

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Frog and Toad
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Nate the Great
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Imagination Station
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Geronimo Stilton
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His sister, when she was 7-8 years old, loved the Amelia Bedelia chapter books by Herman Parish, the Critter Club series by Callie Barkley, The Magic Tree House series written by Mary Pope Osborne, the Thea Stilton series, as well as the seemingly endless Rainbow Magic Fairies book series by Daisy Meadows.

Amelia Bedilia
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Critter Club

Magic Tree House
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 Thea Stilton

Rainbow Magic Fairies

 

 

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3rd & 4th Grade Favorites
   

This past year, as a 9-10 year old, she has thoroughly enjoyed some classics like Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Mary Norton’s The Borrowers series, and E.B. White’s books Trumpet of the Swan and Charlotte’s Web. She also enjoys the Winne the Horse Gentler series written by Dandi Daley Mackall, the Tuesdays at the Castle series by Jessica Day George, and the Magical Animal Adoption Agency series by Kallie George.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
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The Borrowers
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Trumpet of the Swan and Charlotte’s Web
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Winnie the Horse Gentler
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Tuesdays at the Castles
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Magical Animal Agency

When our oldest son was her age (9-10), he took pleasure in reading the How to Train Your Dragon series by Cressida Cowell, The Moffatt series by  Eleanor Estes, and pretty much anything written by Andrew Clements. He also says that he enjoyed the Flashback Four series around that time as well.

How to Train Your Dragon
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The Moffats
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Andrew Clements’ School Stories
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Flashback Four series by Dan Gutman

 

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5th & 6th Grade Favorites
   

During his 5th and 6th grade year (aged 11-12), our son came across several books and series that he was pleased to devour!  He recommends…

C.S. Lewis’ The Chronicles of Narnia series
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The Explorers series by Adrienne Kress
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The Mysterious Benedict Society series by Trenton Lee Stewart
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The Secret Keepers by Trenton Lee Stewart

The Copernicus Legacy series by Tony Abbott

The Hero’s Guide to Saving the Kingdom series by Christopher Healy

The Puzzling World of Winston Breen series by Eric Berlin

The Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling
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The Wizards of Once series by Cressida Cowell

The Hobbit / Lord of the Rings series by J.R.R. Tolkien
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The Mysteries of the Cove series by J. Scott Savage

Masterminds series by Gordon Korman

My second oldest daughter recommends  Wonder, Esperanza Rising, and the Starlight Animal rescue series as well for late elementary and early middle school readers.

Wonder by R. J. Palacio
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Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan
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Starlight Animal Rescue series by Dandi Daley Mackall

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Upper Middle School Favorites
   

My oldest daughters (ages 14 and 16) love to read as well.  Although my oldest daughter has slowed down due to her course work load and her passion for writing her own book, I just can’t keep up with all of the books my 14 year old reads!  For middle schoolers (aged 12-14), she recommends the following books and series…

Viking Quest series by Lois Walfred Johnson

The Clockwork Three by Matthew J. Kirby

Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan
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The City of Ember series by Jeanne DuPrau
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A Night Divided by Jennifer A. Nielsen

The Giver Series by Lois Lowry

Keeper of the Lost Cities  series by Shannon MessengerIMG_5386

Freedom Seekers series by Lois Walfrid Johnson
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The Mozart Season by Virginia Euwer Wolff

The Missing series by Margaret Peterson Haddix

Heartless by Marissa Meyer

Dauntless by Dina L. Sleiman
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Share this list with a child you love and see if they can find a new book or series
that they might enjoy reading this summer
 – either relaxing by the pool during those pesky safety breaks 
– inside sitting under a fan on those dog days of summer
– or staying cool swinging in a hammock enjoying the warm breeze! 

Best Loved Chapter Books

It’s the perfect time to delve into a great book!

 

Please note that the above links are NOT affiliate links.  They are there as quick links to help visitors learn more about each book or series.

Nativity Handprint Crafts

 

Nativity Handprint Crafts

 

I’ve always enjoyed making handprint crafts with young children.  There’s just something about painting their sweet little hands, the giggles that ensue, and the smiles that always result.  And, of course, a memory is made and a print is captured– one that can never be duplicated seeing as our children are constantly growing and changing! 

For the month of December, some common handprints that can be created are snowmen, reindeer, Santa, Christmas trees, hearts, and angels.  Considering our family’s desire to focus more on the true meaning of Christmas and the birth of Jesus, I’ve often desired to make a nativity handprint. After some eager experimentation by my 9 year old, I think we’ve found one that we like!  The painting involved is a bit more detailed than your typical handprint craft, but I think it is well worth the time as it produces a beautiful, meaningful keepsake.

 

Steps to Creating Your ‘Nativity Handprint Craft’

 

1) Choose what item you want to make your nativity handprint on.

You may wish to have your child’s handprint on paper, cardstock, a potholder, an ornament, a December calendar page, etc.

2) Paint your child’s hand.

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You can use washable tempera paint for printing onto paper, but I’d recommend using acrylics for printing onto other items.

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Thumb – angel  (You can paint the entire thumb one color.)

Index and pinky fingers – shepherds 
Ring finger – Mary
Tall finger – Joseph

(Paint the tip of each finger a skin color to form the face and then choose another color for the rest of the finger to be the clothes .  Try to paint each ‘person’s outfit’ a different color.)

Palm – baby Jesus in a blanket, on yellow hay, in a brown manger

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Since there is a lot of paint to be applied (and the paint can dry rapidly), you will want to try to paint quickly and/or may need to retouch a few areas of the hand before going on to the next step.

 

3) Press the painted hand onto your choice of material.

For flat items, simply have your child place their hand straight onto the paper and then gently press their hand down.  For round items, like an ornament, have your child grasp the item.  (You may wish to have them practice them before their hand is painted.) Whatever the item to be printed, encourage your child to not move their fingers or palm in order to avoid smudges and smears.

Once you believe the print is transferred, the child can lift their hand away – straight up from a horizontal surface.   For a round object, you may wish to gently pull the round object away as he/she pulls their hand straight back in the opposite direction.

 

Some examples….

cardstock

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Styrofoam ornamentIMG_3514

plastic fillable ornamentIMG_3532

 

4) Use a small paintbrush to touch up any areas that may not have been filled to your liking.

You could also repaint your pinky to add wings to your angel.

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5) Let air dry. 

The time allowed for drying will vary based upon the material that you chose to paint. (Paper will be quicker than other items.  Our plastic fillable ornaments took at least an hour to dry completely.)

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6) Use colored permanent markers to add details.

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**If your handprint is painted on a clear fillable ornament, you will have a couple of additional steps.

a) stuff with shredded paper

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b) add a Scripture reference

Free printable tags for Luke 2:10-11 at Hubbard’s Cupboard

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c) Attach twine as a hanger and then wrap it with a thin ribbon to form a bow.

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And, there you have it –  
an enjoyable craft that can foster a moment to pause, during this busy season,
and to communicate the meaning of Christmas! 

 

Photos Nativity Handprint Crafts

 

But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid.  I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people.  Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord.”

Luke 2:10-11

A Day in the Life of Growing Independent Learners

Growing Independent Learners

We have five children ranging in age from 15 down to 7 and we have been homeschooling throughout their lives.  With each passing year and with the development of each child, our daily routines have considerably altered.  It’s not bad…it’s just different.  It has truly been a gradual, necessary transformation as our children have grown in their maturity, confidence, and independence.

I vividly remember that, just five short years ago, I used to spend a few hours each day in very hands on school work with our three  elementary aged children, an active preschooler, and an ‘into everything’ toddler.  They were enjoyable days, but bone-weary and challenging.  I loved that we were able to enjoy so many activities together and learn as a family, but I also distinctly  remember feeling very divided among each child since they all needed so much of my attention and direct teaching or assistance. 

from 5 years ago…

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to today…IMG_2210 (2)

Now, our school time gets spread  out longer over the course of the day and we are not able to study as many of our subjects together.  However,  those once elementary aged children are all now either middle school or high school aged,  are much more responsible for their own learning, and are developing interests which I see them taking time to pursue in their ‘non-school’ hours.

It has been rewarding to see our older children begin to ‘own’ their school work, take initiative, and be self sufficient.  We have seen them develop into independent learners!

 

 

So, what does a typical school day look like
for our homeschooling family at this new stage?
 

Well, you might be a bit surprised.

I will be the first to point out that, as the kids have developed and progressed in their autonomy, my own role has changed considerably – from direct teacher to more of a facilitator for most of the kids as they learn.  This has been a difficult process for me as I feel a lot of guilt for not being as engaged and directly involved as I once was in their education.  However, I am confident (as is my husband) that this is what our kids need in order to succeed.  So, I‘ve been gradually and intentionally giving our children more options, space, and time to learn and flourish.

 

Here’s a sample day!
(a full day at home, one without music lessons or other outside learning with friends)

Morning

  • Our 6th grader is habitually up around 6:00am to start his schoolwork.  He chooses this time of day because it is quieter and there are no distractions.

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  • I’m typically awake between 7 and 7:30am.  I check in with our 6th grader and then do my Bible reading/memory work, showering, eating, and a bit of computer work.  Characteristically, I am ready to dive full force into school with the kids by 9am (well, after I start a load of laundry =) ).  (This is so different from my former season with lots of little ones.  Then, it was critical for me to be awake before all of the children so that I would have ample time to get ready for the day and have a quiet time with the Lord.)
  • Our 4th, 8th, and 10th grade girls wake up and get moving around the same time as myself.  They can be found doing their own morning routines which includes Bible devotions and AWANA work.  Our oldest often begins schoolwork during breakfast at the kitchen  table. The other girls prefer to start working at their desks in the school room.
  • As for our second grader, lately, I have been having to wake up him up -no later than 9am.  (Can you say ’growth spurt’? LOL.)
  • I usually start the school time by listening to all of the kids’ AWANA verses and helping the youngest two to memorize their Scripture work.
  • I make sure to check school work that has been completed by our 6th grader and review/assist him with any errors or misconceptions that I may notice that he has.
  • Next, I devote a large chunk of the morning to focus on our 2nd grader.   As is to be expected, he still has lots of ‘work with mom’ subjects.  These include Bible, AWANA, All About Reading, book basket reading, read-alouds, English, and spelling. He does pretty well with math and just needs some assistance with it from time to time as well as direct teaching for brand new concepts. His Xtra math and piano are independent. He is then free to play until I call him for history and science later in the day. (Our 6th and 4th grader complete a Bible study together during this time as well as work on other subjects independently, coming to ask questions as needed.)

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  • Mid-morning, kids may get a snack.
  • After working intensely with our youngest,  I usually take a break to check in on our 8th and 10th graders to see how they are progressing and to see if they need help with anything.  (By the way, several of our 8th grader’s subjects, such as math, Spanish, and literature, are online. Our 10th grader takes an online math course, but she has chosen more book based subjects this year. )

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  • Reading and discussing literature as well as dictating spelling with my 4th grader is commonly next. 
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  • After that, I’ll try to sneak in a few minutes to ask and discuss science with our 6th grader.
  • As lunch nears, if it works with what she is doing, I try to work on Literary Analysis with my 10th grader.
  • Right before lunch, I, once again, check more work and meet with kids as needed for corrections and assistance.

Afternoon

  • Then it is time for a much need lunch break all together, followed by the completion of kitchen chores.  I also check the menu plan and start the crockpot (if it is necessary) as well as  make sure to switch laundry (if I have forgotten it earlier in the day, which is quite typical ;-) ).
  • After lunch, it is usually history time.  I like to do history with our 2nd and 4th grader first.  Afterwards, I call our 6th and 8th grader to work on history together.

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  • At this point, many of our children are finished with their school day. Our 6th grader typically spends his afternoon free time on coding/ Khan Academy, constructing intricate paper modeling, building with Legos, trying out a cool science experiment that he has found, or either reading or listening to a book for his enjoyment.  The 4th and 2nd graders are usually off playing together.
  • I once again check in with the 8th and 10th graders to see how they are progressing and to see if they need help with anything.  (Our 8th grader is also normally finished with her school day by this point and enjoys reading for fun, checking out new recipes to try, sneaking in some additional piano practice, or hanging out with her siblings.)
  • I’ll meet with our 10th grader to go over her daily end of chapter history questions and, once a week, her weekly end of chapter health questions.  We’ll also discuss her writing assignments.
  • As for science with my 2nd and 4th grader, um, well, in all honesty, we still haven’t started it yet.  Sigh.  But, over the years, I’ve learned that  we will get there eventually and it will all work out by the end of the school year!
  • Laundry and dinner prep sneak up fast at this point of the day.

Evening

  • We then have dinner as a family, followed by chores.
  • After chores, we may have evening commitments outside the home or a time of free choice for what the children desire to do.
  • In the evenings, right before bedtime, my husband has been reading a YWAM Missionary Biography with all of the kids as well as leading a prayer time for missionaries and for our sponsored compassion child.  (He used to try to do this in the mornings, but as the kids grow, they tend to need more sleep.  So, our schedule has been adjusted accordingly.)

Throughout the Day

I delight in listening to the sounds of the piano, cello, and violins as the kids take turns practicing when the ‘music room’ becomes free.  I also get to witness gymnastics and crazy sibling antics, aid in resolving sibling squabbles, hear lots of ‘mommy, look at this’, answer tons of questions, refer them to God’s Word, and experience lots of hugs.  I truly do LOVE them and enjoy that I get to be home for them!

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When we first started on this homeschooling journey with lots of little ones,
I would never have been able to envision the relatively calm, productive days that we experience now.
 

Yes, our days are still full and busy, but it’s a different kind of full, a different kind of busy.  These days require much pre-planning to ensure our children’s independence and lots of intentionality to guarantee I am taking time to come alongside our kids and meeting them where they are each day.  It’s far from perfect and I admit that I’m not the greatest at juggling this new stage, but I’m thankful that God is challenging me and growing me, too.   It is a great privilege and season of joy as I get to spend time with my favorite people, guiding them as they develop into independent learners who love the Lord.

 

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Past posts on a typical homeschooling day for our family…
Homeschooling – Day in the Life (K, preK, toddler, and expecting our 4th)
A Day in My Life – as a 9th Grade Homeschooler

Our 2017-2018 Curriculum

Workboxes – a stepping stone to independence

Solar Eclipse Activities

 

Solar Eclipse Activities

 

Start by Learning about the Phases of the Moon

1. View an Informative Video about Moon Phases

2. Watch and then Participate in a Moon Phase Demonstration

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3. Review Moon Phases by sequencing the Phases of the Moon and matching the definitions. We used these free 3 Part Moon Phases Cards from  ETC Montessori. (You may need to type ‘moon’ into the search field.)

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4. Create an Edible Phases of the Moon Model
This was such a fun moon model idea shared by 4th Grade Frolics.

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Turn your focus onto the Solar Eclipse

Create a paper and brass fastener Solar Eclipse Model 

Learn all about a solar eclipse through Free Videos!

Watch and then conduct your own Solar Eclipse Demonstrations
Video Demonstration (from The Guardian)

Read Articles and Track the Eclipse

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Build a Pinhole Viewer and Discuss Eye Safety

 

Create Some Out of this World Art
 Chalk Pastel Solar Eclipse  (free tutorial from Hodgepodge)

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Don’t forget to enjoy some fun Solar Eclipse Food
Think Sun Chips, Capri Suns, Moon Pies, crescent shaped sandwiches, moon and sun shapes cut from fruit or cheese, cupcakes with yellowish orange frosting and an Oreo on top, etc.

Remember to reflect upon the greatness of our Lord, the Creator God!
Memorize Psalm 19:1 or begin working on learning the entire Psalm! (We have a free Psalm 19 memorization booklet and copywork for kids as well as a memorization and meditation booklet for moms and older kids on our Bible Memorization page.)

The heavens declare the glory of God.
The skies proclaim the work of his hands.

 

May you enjoy this special event with your children (and stay safe)!  
And, if you happen to miss it, there is another one coming across the United States on April 8, 2024!

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